Black History Month

Dancing a piece of cultural history like the Lindy Hop requires not only learning about the inventors, innovators, and artists of jazz music and dancing, but also about its position within the larger, unbroken history of the African diaspora in America. This February, provide a proof of purchase to any of these events and receive a free half-hour private lesson with Lori. Current and continuing students will receive a 50% lesson discount for each proof of purchase. Explore the inextricable value of black arts and culture within, because, and despite its complex history with the United States.

If you have other events or items you have purchased and want to know if it qualifies for this promotion, just drop me a line! This list is curated for your convenience, but there are of course a myriad of ways to further your understanding of black history and culture.

 

Juliana Huxtable, Untitled (Psychosocial Stuntin’), 2015. Color inkjet print. The Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 2015.8.1. © Juliana Huxtable. Courtesy the artist and American Federation of Arts

Juliana Huxtable, Untitled (Psychosocial Stuntin’), 2015. Color inkjet print. The Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 2015.8.1. © Juliana Huxtable. Courtesy the artist and American Federation of Arts

Highlights from the Studio Museum in Harlem

on exhibit JAN 16, 2019-APR 14, 2019
The museum of the african diaspora, San francisco

The MoAD offers programs that showcase the art, history, and cultural richness of the African Diaspora. Their goal is to explore and celebrate the beliefs, practices, traditions, and customs connected to these movements. They are the inaugural venue for Black Refractions: Highlights from The Studio Museum in Harlem, a major traveling exhibition created by the American Federation of Arts (AFA) in collaboration with The Studio Museum in Harlem. Black Refractions surveys close to a century of creative achievements by artists of African descent and is the first traveling exhibition in twenty-five years to reveal the breadth and expansive growth of the Studio Museum’s permanent collection. MoAD’s showing of the exhibition includes over sixty works by over fifty artists across all media dating from the 1920s to the present.


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Mildred Howard’s TAP: Investigation of Memory

on exhibit February 2 – September 1, 2019
Oakland Museum of California

Discover Mildred Howard’s TAP: Investigation of Memory, a powerful multimedia installation that examines themes of identity, church culture, gentrification, dance, activism, and more. Born to activist parents, Howard’s family lineage and community inform much of her work. Part of OMCA’s Collection, this major artwork incorporates an antique shoe-shine stand from Oakland’s historic California Hotel, once a cultural center for the Black community, as the altar-like centerpiece, alongside white shoes and metal shoe taps arranged in a pattern covering the gallery floor. Symbolizing memories from her past and tap dance’s influence on her life, learn how Howard’s work has helped shape the narrative of activism in the Bay Area and continues to inspire artists today.


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Tiffany Austin Quartet

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 (6:30PM – 7:30PM)
East Palo Alto Library
2415 University Avenue
East Palo Alto CA 94303

Austin will present music from her new album,  "Unbroken" which includes Jazz, Soul, Blues, and Spirituals. This is how Tiffany describes "Unbroken", “From the shores of Africa to the plantations, the church houses, the juke joints, concert halls, city blocks and boomboxes, the spirit and musical traditions of African American people remains unbroken. 'Unbroken' is a testament to that Lazarus-like power: a constellation of songs of freedom, faith, love and hope to remind us that despite the turbulence of our times, we continue to endure."


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Poetry Reading With Charif Shanahan

Wednesday, February 20, 2019 (6:30PM – 7:45PM)
East Palo Alto Library
2415 University Avenue
East Palo Alto CA 94303

In Into Each Room We Enter without Knowing, poet Charif Shanahan explores the various ways in which we as a species inherit identity constructs, chiefly about race and sexuality, and how we navigate those constructs in the creation of our identities. His book was named a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry and the Publishing Triangle's Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry. There will be a Q&A session and book sales/book signing following the reading.